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Posts Tagged ‘learning ecosystem’

Managing Change or Leading Change: Does It Matter?

July 28, 2016 Leave a comment

At first glance Change Management (CM) and Change Leadership (CL) may be considered interchangeable and simply more jargon used to confuse a familiar concept. Stay with me on this post as there is a significant difference when the end-game is the desire to create full adoption and sustained capability of any Change initiative.  Read more…

ECOSYSTEM: Is the Concept Jive, Jargon or Justified?

October 16, 2014 Leave a comment

One of the more recent buzzwords surfacing in our L&D lexicon is “Ecosystem”, and I see it as having more significance to a sustainable learning and performance strategy than acceptance. Several pundits like Rosenburg, Mosher and Gottfredson, among others are using “ecosystem” routinely in conversations and presentations. The question that jumps into my brain is “Why seek what you already have?” I say this primarily because every organization already has a Learning & Performance Ecosystem. The question that manifests from “Why seek…” is “It’s not really a question of having an ecosystem; the real question is – Are you managing the one you have effectively and efficiently?” Read more…

Feeding the Performance Zone with EPS

If workforce competency came in a can, I’d wager someplace on the label you would find Embedded Performer Support [EPS] with a mix of Performer Support [PS] assets listed as active ingredients. When EPS is not included in the effort to feed [develop and sustain] the workforce with a balanced performance diet, you’re probably only looking at a 16-ounce can of Training. Training serves as a great appetizer, but the main course may reside on a buffet where the Performer can choose from a mix of choices based upon the nature of their hunger [moment of need]. Read more…

Admiring the Problem of Moving to a Performance Paradigm

January 15, 2014 1 comment

In a previous life, I had a boss that used the phrase “admiring the problem” when there was an opportunity staring us in the face and all we could muster was a string of meetings to discuss; agree on key points; white board thoughts and great ideas; discuss a little bit more; and then schedule a follow-up meeting to discuss what we had just discussed. No action on innovative ideas seemed to ever gain any traction, so we just stayed in that comfortable status quo position to see and agree that what we had before us was an obvious opportunity. Sound familiar? Read more…

Embedded Performance Support & Scaling to Successful Implementation

August 6, 2013 2 comments

Implementing Embedded Performance Support [EPS] can be as daunting a task as eating an entire elephant. Not sure I’d ever want to eat an elephant, but if I did, it would be one bite at a time versus scarfing down the whole thing. One bite at a time rings true for implementing EPS as well. Keep in mind that EPS is not a technology [though technology may well be part of the effort]; EPS is a discipline. Read more…

Mapping the Work Context for Performance Support

August 19, 2012 9 comments

With all the recent press performance support is getting…make that positive press…I’m noticing that we could easily slip into a best practice of admiring the problem of what to do about it. To be a bit less sarcastic, I must clarify that admiration of the problem is NOT a best practice, but it often seems like we manage to do it best. Read more…

Myopic Vision Limits Training Effectiveness

June 28, 2012 1 comment

Once again, I find motivation flung upon me to grind out a new post based upon an awesome question asked this morning in one of my networking groups. The question, “Do we see a myopic view by training [L&D] limiting training’s impact?” And a second part, “What do we need to do to overcome it?” One response suggested it was not so much “myopic” as it was “funnel vision!” I heartily agree, and on either view [sorry…], if our vision does not peek through a more holistic lens to view the learning environment as a dynamic ecosystem, we will never progress beyond our current limits. Read more…

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